CALL FOR ENTRIES IS CLOSED JUDGING WILL TAKE PLACE SEPTEMBER 18, 2018

Categories

Call for Entries

The Japan Cider & Perry Awards is currently limited to commercial ciders only.

Ciders must be registered and arrived in Japan by September 7, 2018 to be considered for the event. The entry fee for the first cider is ¥15,000; subsequent entries will receive discounts. Entry rules and forms can be found on our Registration Page. Winners will be announced on September 25, 2018.

2018 JCPA Categories

Class 1: Modern Cider (3.5% – 8.5% ABV)
1.1 Dry <1005 gravity
1.2 Medium 1005 – 1015 gravity
1.3 Sweet >1015 gravity

Class 2: Traditional Cider (3.5% – 8.5% ABV)
2.1 Dry <1005 gravity
2.2 Medium 1005 – 1015 gravity
2.3 Sweet >1015 gravity

Class 3: Perry (3.5% – 8.5% ABV)
3.1 Dry <1005 gravity
3.2 Medium/Sweet >1005 gravity

Class 4: Flavoured Cider (3.5% – 8.5% ABV)
4.1 Cider with Fruits & Flowers
4.2 Cider with Herbs & Spices

Class 5: Hopped Cider (3.5% – 8.5% ABV)

Class 6: Open Class (3.5% – 20% ABV)

Category Descriptions

Class 1: Modern Cider (3.5% – 8.5% ABV)

These ciders are less defined by tannin, but more so by acidity and fruitiness. Typical examples of these styles of cider can be found in Central Europe, such as Western Germany and Luxembourg, whilst modern interpretations are typical of ‘New World’ cider making regions, such as USA, Australia, and Japan.

These ciders can be made with specific, traditional cider apple varieties, heirloom varieties or dessert/culinary apples.

This class can include in-bottle fermented ciders. These ciders, after their primary fermentation, have been transferred into a bottle with the addition of sugar (and possibly yeast) and then sealed. The cider undergoes a secondary fermentation in the bottle creating a natural carbonation within the cider.

The cider may be left at this point with a natural yeast deposit in the bottom of the bottle or can undergo the full methode traditionelle process, where via riddling and disgorging, the yeast is removed. Both methods are applicable in this category.

These ciders may be still or sparkling.

Expected characteristics:
Aroma: fresh citrus, green apple, apple strudel
Flavour: crisp or sour acidity, but with appropriate fruitiness and/or sweetness to balance
Mouthfeel: light and vibrant on the palette but normally with a short aftertaste

Sweetness parameters:
Class 1.1 Dry: cider with a Specific Gravity reading of <1.005
Class 1.2 Medium: cider with a Specific Gravity reading of 1.005 to <1.015
Class 1.3 Sweet: cider with a Specific Gravity reading of >1.015

Class 2: Traditional Cider (3.5% – 8.5% ABV)

Traditional ciders are made with high tannin apples that are typical of the West of England and Northern France. These ciders are predominantly identified by the presence of polyphenols, some of which elicit an impact upon aroma, and others – tannins – which impact upon the taste, structure, and mouthfeel.

The flavour characteristics are achieved through the use of traditional apple varieties which have been grown for centuries for the sole purpose of making cider.

This class also includes Sidra Natural from Spain or those ciders inspired by the cider from this region. These ciders are dominated by volatile phenolics and volatile acidity with a balance of acidity and tannin.

This class can include ciders made using the ‘keeving’ method. This method is classically utilised by the traditional styles of cider made in the Normandy and Brittany regions of France. Utilising the keeving (or cuvage) method, ciders of a naturally lower alcohol and naturally higher sweetness can be achieved. These styles of ciders are characterised by bold, rich volatile phenolics and big, soft, rich tannins.

This class can include in-bottle fermented ciders. These ciders, after their primary fermentation, have been transferred into a bottle with the addition of sugar (and possibly yeast) and then sealed. The cider undergoes a secondary fermentation in the bottle creating a natural carbonation within the cider.

The cider may be left at this point with a natural yeast deposit in the bottom of the bottle or can undergo the full methode traditionelle process, where via riddling and disgorging, the yeast is removed. Both methods are applicable in this category.

These ciders may be still or sparkling.

Expected characteristics:
Aroma: ranging between fruity, spicy, medicinal or ‘funky’ (contributing to overall complexity and not being overtly dominant)
Flavour: a balance of acidity, bitterness, astringency, sweetness and fruitiness
Mouthfeel: broad, layered and complex with a long aftertaste

Sweetness parameters:
Class 2.1 Dry: cider with a Specific Gravity reading of <1.005
Class 2.2 Medium: cider with a Specific Gravity reading of 1.005 to <1.015
Class 2.3 Sweet: cider with a Specific Gravity reading of >1.015

Class 3 Perry (3.5% – 8.5% ABV)

Perry is an overarching name given to result of the fermentation of pears. Although technically not a cider, the similarity in the process and the intertwined heritage means that Perry is generally considered as being a style under the broader cider umbrella.

Traditional Perry is a drink that is made from specific pears that have been grown for the intention of making a fermented drink (rather than dessert pears). This tradition can be found in England, France, and Central Europe, especially Switzerland and Austria. Traditional Perry is characterised by the presence of tannins, which impact upon the taste, structure, and mouthfeel.

Modern Perry (sometimes known as Pear Cider) is the term generally given to the fermentation of dessert and culinary pears. These drinks do not display the tannic characters of the traditional European perry pears. These drinks can, and are, being made all over the world, but especially in areas where perry pears do not exist.

This class can include perry made using the in-bottle fermented techniques describes in Classes 1 & 2.

These drinks can be still or sparkling.

Expected characteristics:
Aroma: estery (confectionary), floral and perfumed, potentially some volatile phenolics expected for Traditional Perry
Flavour: depending on variety, can display any combination of fresh acidity, fruitiness, and tannin
Mouthfeel: generally light/mid-weight, but can be very bold – depends upon the levels of tannin

Sweetness parameters:
Class 3.1 Dry: cider with a Specific Gravity reading of <1.005
Class 3.2 Medium/Sweet: cider with a Specific Gravity reading of >1.005

Class 4 Flavoured Cider (3% – 8.5% ABV)

Defined as the fermentation of apple juice to include the addition of other fruits and flavours. Key to the presentation of these ciders is the balance and integration between the fermented apple and the added flavour.

There are no sweetness parameters defined in this Class. These ciders may be still or sparkling. Flavoured perry can be entered into both Class 4.1 and Class 4.2 as appropriate.

Class 4.1: Cider with Fruits & Flowers

This class includes cider with the addition of fruits other than apple and/or flowers and blossom from plants and trees. This could include, but is not limited to: strawberry, blackcurrant, watermelon, elderflower, orange blossom, rose water, honey etc.

Expected characteristics:
Aroma: some cider notes, combined with the attributes of the relevant fruits and/or flowers
Flavour: cider characteristics dominate and are enhanced/complemented by the addition of the relevant fruits and/or flowers
Mouthfeel: can range from light to full-bodied, depending on apple variety and fruit/flower type

Class 4.2: Cider with Herbs, Spices & Honey

This class includes cider with the addition of herbs & spices. This could include but is not limited to: rosemary, chili, ginger, cardamom etc.

Expected characteristics:
Aroma: some cider notes, combined with the attributes of the relevant herbs or spices
Flavour: cider characteristics dominate and are enhanced/complemented by the addition of the relevant herbs and/or spices
Mouthfeel: can range from light to full-bodied, depending on apple variety and herb/spice type

Class 5: Hopped Cider (3.5% – 8.5% ABV)

This class includes cider with the addition of hops. These hopped ciders are becoming increasingly prevalent on the global scale, especially in North America. The hops can be added at any stage of the cider making process. Key to the presentation of these ciders is the balance and integration between the fermented apple and the hops.

There are no sweetness parameters defined in this Class. These ciders may be still or sparkling. Hopped perry can be entered into this Class.

Expected characteristics:
Aroma: hop dominating but backed up with cider notes
Flavour: cider characteristic enhanced/complemented by the addition of hops – not overly dominated
Mouthfeel: can range from light to full-bodied and soft to bitter depending on apple and hop varieties used

Class 6: Open Cider (3.5% – 20% ABV)

This class contains cider that does not adequately fit into any other category. As this is the first year of the JCPA, the number of categories have been limited. This will mean there could be certain products that, through a specific methodology or process, would be unfairly judged if entered into Classes 1 – 5.

Examples of ciders that could be entered into class include, but are not limited to:

Barrel Aged Cider: whereby the barrel imparts a flavour (e.g. fresh oak or spirit)
Ice Cider: using cryo-concentration or cry-extraction of apple juice to create a sweet, dessert like cider
Apple Wines: cider that has been chaptalized to take the ABV above 8.5%
Co-fermentation: the fermentation of apple juice with another fermentable liquid (e.g. beer wort, grape must, etc.)
Fortified Cider: the addition of a spirit (normally distilled cider) to cider or juice (e.g. Pommeau)
Low Alcohol: a cider between 0% and <3.5% ABV (does not include apple juice!) There are no sweetness parameters in this Class. These ciders may be still or sparkling. Perry can be entered into this Class. Given the huge range of potential different styles, flavours, and characters in this Class, each cider will be judged on its own merit in the context of its specialty style.